All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city.

Katie Hunter-Lowrey

Since 2011, NOLA to Angola has been uniting people in a 170-mile solidarity bike ride from Municipal Court in the shadow of Orleans Parish Prison to Angola Prison, and that solidarity extends way beyond the miles trekked on the ride. The ride focuses on bringing people together, no matter what barriers separate them. NolaVie's Kelley Crawford speaks with Katie Hunter-Lowrey, one of the ride's organizers.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.

Kate Richardson

Right now, the Hispanic and Latino population in Baton Rouge is suffering with particular needs after the floods. Some of the problems are the same as those faced by Latino residents and workers after Katrina, and some are different. WWNO's "All Things New Orleans" asked Eduardo Courtade for insight on that situation, as well as other issues and events being talked about in the region's Spanish-speaking communities. He's Program Director for local stations Radio Tropical and La Fabulosa, which play music in addition to covering sports and news in Spanish.

The Saints take to the Dome for a big game on Monday night. But not all the action is generated by the players on the field. Fans are pumping up to express the indefinable spirit that is Saints culture -- everything from dance moves by the 610 Stompers to chants of "Who Dat!" NolaVie's Renee Peck talks to the Saints' Director of Game Day Entertainment, Jared Sampson, to find out about the elaborate planning that goes into entertainment at the Superdome.  

Eve Troeh

This week on All Things New Orleans, we get into Cajun country rice fields with Tegan Wendland, for an update on ruined crops after the 2016 Louisiana floods. Public policy lawyer Jeffrey Thomas has made disaster a bigger part of his work after the levee failures of Katrina. He talks about the road ahead for long-term recovery and using federal funds to help flooded communities.

Taylor Williams
Mark Reynolds

Between overgrown vines, prickly thorns, and bugs of all kinds, the Louisiana environment presents a formidable challenge for any landscaper. No one knows this better than horticulturist Taylor Williams, who comes armed with pruning shears wherever he goes. On the eve of this year’s harvest, Kelley Crawford spoke with Taylor about his experiences in the weeds and wilds of Louisiana’s backyard.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford. 

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Sea level rise and land loss is affecting communities all over the world, not just in Louisiana. But Louisiana has one of the first communities that will be entirely resettled as a result: the Isle de Jean Charles.

  

 


Kaitlin Marone
Kaitlin Marone

Stand-up comedy has never been central to New Orleans culture, but that may be changing. Many local comedians have found a home at the New Movement Theater on Saint Claude Avenue. Writer and comedian Kaitlin Marone has become a mainstay of the New Movement's stage through a unique humor that challenges convention. NolaVie’s David Benedetto sat down with Kaitlin to talk about how she’s developing her own brand of comedy.  

Rosalind Brown and Vernel Bagneris in One Mo' Time, written and directed by Mr. Bagneris.
Carol Rosegg / Historic New Orleans Collection

Vernel Bagneris was working in New Orleans’ theater scene for years when his musical about black vaudeville performers hit the big time. And while talent and luck play a role in every Cinderella story, Vernal says there was another key element to the success of One Mo’ Time. He spoke with historian Mark Cave.

Eve Troeh

This week, as we mark another anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the levee breaches and floods, our minds turn to the tens of thousands of flood victims across south Louisiana. As they take first steps toward recovery, WWNO devotes this week's "All Things New Orleans" program to lessons learned, resources shared, and well wishes from our city to the deluged areas around Baton Rouge and Lafayette.

New Orleans Summer And Other Harsh Truths

Sep 1, 2016


When I left New Orleans as a young adult to pursue an education and later a career in other parts of America, I quickly realized that simply being from the 504 carried with it a certain exotic quality. “Wait,” new acquaintances would say, “you’re actually from New Orleans? I never thought that someone could, you know...grow up there…”

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