All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4 p.m.
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel
Jack Hopke

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special — sometimes quirky — features.

With the GNO Info Minute at 5:59 p.m.

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Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

After The Waves, Staten Island Homeowner Takes Sandy Buyout

Stephen Drimalas stands outside his former home in Staten Island's Ocean Breeze neighborhood. He rebuilt his home after Superstorm Sandy but recently decided to sell it to the state of New York.
Jennifer Hsu WNYC

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:59 am

Two years after Superstorm Sandy struck the Northeast, hundreds of Staten Islanders are deciding whether to sell their shorefront homes to New York state, which wants to knock them down and let the empty land act as a buffer to the ocean.

Stephen Drimalas was one Staten Islander faced with this tough decision. He lived in a bungalow not far from the beach in the working-class neighborhood of Ocean Breeze. He barely escaped Sandy's floodwaters with his life.

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Around the Nation
5:16 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

As Infrastructure Crumbles, Trillions Of Gallons Of Water Lost

A water maintenance crew works on leaky infrastructure in Skokie, a Chicago suburb. The area loses almost 22 billion gallons of water a year because of ailing infrastructure.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:13 pm

Imagine Manhattan under almost 300 feet of water. Not water from a hurricane or a tsunami, but purified drinking water — 2.1 trillion gallons of it.

That's the amount of water that researchers estimate is lost each year in this country because of aging and leaky pipes, broken water mains and faulty meters.

Fixing that infrastructure won't be cheap, which is something every water consumer is likely to discover.

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Movie Interviews
5:16 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

At 83, Filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard Makes The Leap To 3-D

Jean-Luc Godard's dog, Roxy, is prominently featured in Goodbye to Language, wandering through the countryside, conversing with the lake and the river.
Kino Lorber Inc.

Back in the 1960s Jean-Luc Godard made his name in the French New Wave by breaking cinematic rules. Some 40 years later, he's still doing things his own way. Now, at age 83, he's taking on 3-D in a new film called Goodbye to Language, which shared the Jury Prize at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival.

There are elements of Goodbye to Language you might find in any Hollywood movie — people arguing, a shootout — and even a dog, the director's own. (Roxy wanders the countryside conversing with the lake and the river that want to tell him what humans never hear.)

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Economy
4:29 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Janet Yellen Brings A Different Leadership Style To The Fed

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 5:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
4:24 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

Mumadou Traore says the Ivory Coast's French bureaucracy is a "blessing" when it comes to Ebola.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 5:16 pm

There are all kinds of theories why Ebola hasn't arrived in Ivory Coast, despite the fact that it shares a long and very porous border with two Ebola-afflicted countries, Liberia and Guinea.

Some Ivory Coastians credit a beefed-up border patrol. The religious citizens in this Catholic country thank God. But Mumadou Traore, who works as a field coordinator for CARE International, has a third theory. He credits the legendarily infuriating Ivorian bureacracy.

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Space
4:24 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

18 Student Science Experiments Lost In Rocket Explosion

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 5:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music
1:39 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Who Sang It First? Mockingbirds And Musicians Cover Each Other In New Orleans

A short phrase New Orleans musicians use to communicate is identical to a common mockingbird call.
Sven Halling Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:47 pm

In certain New Orleans music scenes, there is a special sound — a signal — that lets players know it's time to pick up their instruments and strike up the band.

"It's a bugle call, or a band call, to assemble," trumpeter Leroy Jones says.

"It's like: C'mon, rally," musician Matt Bell adds. "Come to the bandstand and be ready to do it. Let's go."

The four-note phrase, however, doesn't belong to musicians alone. Another common New Orleans species, the mockingbird, also produces the call.

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National Security
5:30 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Security Beefed Up At Federal Buildings Across U.S.

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Parallels
5:10 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

With A Soft Approach On Gangs, Nicaragua Eschews Violence

A statue of Jesus Christ called "Cristo Rey" is prominently located near the entrance of the Dimitrov neighborhood, which used to be so violent, people joked the Christ was being held up at gunpoint.
Juan Carlos for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 6:59 pm

As the sun sinks just below the horizon, Jorge Sandoval strolls across a dusty street.

He's a small man in his 50s, who runs volunteer patrols. The neighborhood is poor. The houses are cobbled together out of leftover wood and pieces of metal.

Two years ago, Sandoval says, these streets used to be desolate and controlled by gangs.

"They would shoot at each other at all hours," Sandoval says. "Suddenly you'd find someone injured, someone innocent, because they just didn't care."

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History
3:57 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Jonas Salk's Polio Vaccine Trials Would Be Hard To Repeat Today

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 5:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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