Thomas Walsh

Producer

Thomas Walsh is an independent radio producer and audio engineer who lives in New Orleans. After making his way to public radio in 2010, Thomas has produced features for Louisiana Eats!, Nola Life Stories, and engineered storytelling events like The Moth. A self-proclaimed movie geek, he's seen every film listed on the American Film Institute's 100 Years...100 Movies.

Ways to Connect

Historic New Orleans Collection

If you kept tabs on local politics over the past several decades, then Jackie Clarkson’s name isn’t lost on you. This staunch Democrat represented many of the city’s downtown neighborhoods from Bywater and Treme to the French Quarter and Algiers, her childhood home.

But what influenced her to pursue a life in politics? Mark Cave found out when he interviewed Ms. Clarkson for this edition of NOLA Life Stories.

Leon Trice, photographer / Historic New Orleans Collection

On January 1, 1935 Americans were dealing with some big issues: the Great Depression had crippled the economy and the Dust Bowl had scoured the land. But down in New Orleans the mood was celebratory: football players getting ready to meet each other at the inaugural Sugar Bowl.

Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Leah Chase: say the name and New Orleanians know exactly who you’re talking about. She’s a great chef, a civil rights activist, and an avid art collector. And it’s not a stretch to say that – to some people – she’s the maternal figure of the city. On this edition of Nola Life Stories, Leah Chase, in her own words.  

This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection.

Marion Post Wolcott / Library of Congress

The historic Dew Drop Inn in Central City is in the midst of a revival. For many years it was the hot spot in the Jim Crow South where guests could catch a show, grab a sandwich, spend a night, and even get a haircut.

Thomas Walsh

People’s expectations about “entertainment” aren’t what they used to be. What passed for fun as little as 10 years ago can’t compete with the stimulating, instant gratification of our iWorld.

The owners of the Musee Conti Wax Museum know this too well: earlier this year they sold the building, which will close in January and be replaced by a set of condominiums. Sandra Weil gave tours there for nearly 30 years and shares the back story of the museum.

Historic New Orleans Collection

When Sal Impastato handed over the keys of the Napoleon House this past spring, it was an emotional moment.

Selling the business to restauranteur Ralph Brennan had been a difficult decision because the building had been in Sal’s family for generations – first as a grocery, then as a bar.

Historic New Orleans Collection

Lois Tillman fondly remembers a Chinaberry tree that was in the yard of her childhood home. It was there that her Papa taught her to love poetry, which began her literary journey.

As the years came and went, Lois became a teacher, a writer, and a performance poet known as Starlyte.  She found out inspiration comes in many forms, from the terrestrial to the cosmic.

WWNO 89.9 FM

A lot changes in 10 years. Here at WWNO, we’ve witnessed many transformations since the summer of 2005: we’ve expanded our format, started a local news department, and even won some awards.

None of that would have been possible without the memorable efforts of WWNO’s staff who kept the radio station running after Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed.

StoryCorps

In the immediate days after Hurricane Katrina, Ben Rongey’s father gave him a special pass which gave him full access to Jefferson Parish. At the time he was a high school senior and acted accordingly: he called his friend Wyatt Higgins so they could explore the city together.

They smooth-talked a National Guardsman, crossed into Orleans Parish, and headed for Wyatt’s house. Flood waters prevented them from driving into the Gentilly neighborhood, so they parked the car and walked the final trek.

Thomas Walsh

The Monumental Task Committee, a volunteer organization that looks after New Orleans monuments, is hosting a public forum on Tuesday, August 25, 2015. The goal is to discuss the fate of four Confederate-themed statues.

The debate on whether New Orleans should continue hosting depictions of General Robert E. Lee and other Civil War Confederate heroes started in June, after the racially charged shooting of eight black parishioners at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. That state decided to stop flying the Confederate flag at the state capital. And soon after Mayor Landrieu opened a dialogue on his city’s use of Confederate symbols, namely a series of statues.

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