Nina Feldman

Contributor

Nina Feldman is an independent producer based in New Orleans. She produces feature news stories for WWNO and her work has appeared on The World, Latino USA, NPR's The Salt, and State of the Re:Union among others. She is also the founder and emcee of New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling, or NO LAW.

Shannon Powell
American Routes

Each week, American Routes Shortcuts offers a taste of the upcoming American Routes episode. This week, it’s Timekeepers: drummers and rhythm makers from New Orleans and beyond. Today, Shannon Powell is live in the studio. He showed us how it’s done on the drums and chatted about music in church, growing up in the Treme. For the full episode, tune into WWNO Saturday at 7, Sunday at 6, or listen at americanroutes.org.

Lewis Family Museum
American Routes

This week on American Routes: how do we preserve the power of music in museum and memory? Jerry Lee Lewis was born in 1935 Ferriday, LA. The house he grew up in is now a museum, filled with family memorabilia ranging from religious art work to bodies, buried in the front yard. Host Nick Spitzer spent an afternoon with sister Frankie Jean, the curator of Lewis museum.

Marty Stuart and Connie Smith
American Routes

This week American Routes Shortcuts brings you country music’s most beloved and unconventional couple. Marty Stuart grew up in Philadelphia MS learning old time country music. He’d mastered mandolin by age 12. As a kid, he loved listening to the well-respected Connie Smith sing at the Grand Ole Opry. Marty and Connie told host Nick Spitzer how they first met.

Sonny Landreth
American Routes

Each week, American Routes Shortcuts offers a sneak peek into the upcoming American Routes episode. This time, host Nick Spitzer gets a music lesson from Louisiana slide guitarist and storyteller Sonny Landreth. A native of Mississippi who moved to Lafayette at a young age, Landreth found himself mixing Cajun, Zydeco and rock n roll, while writing about life in southern Louisiana. Sonny Landreth joined Nick, live in the studio with his Fender Stratocaster and of course, his slide.

Santos Alvarado at a demonstration in front of City Hall last summer.
Fernando Lopez

New Orleans is officially a Welcoming City for immigrants. That’s because last September the City Council passed an ordinance to that effect, as part of a national initiative. But what does that actually mean? Now, four months after the resolution was passed, the City has taken some small but meaningful steps to make New Orleans feel like home for immigrants.

A Canal Street streetcar.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Streetcars are an iconic part of New Orleans’ history, but they’re also a very real part of the transportation system. The city is investing more in the system, with a new Rampart Street line under construction.

The Regional Transit Authority says the new line will spur business and job growth, but local riders wonder if a streetcar is really the best way to get them to and from work – or if it’s more for tourists.

Local apparrel and accessory company NOLA Til Ya Die.
Nina Feldman

New Orleans is a city with a lot of nicknames. It’s been known as the Crescent City, the City that Care Forgot and the Big Easy. But there’s a new kid on the block.

Over the course of the past 10 years the name "NOLA" has made its way into businesses, non-profits, websites and even the city government. And while no one doubts its convenience, not everyone is on board with the new shorthand.

Special to the Southern Education Desk

Over the last two years, there has been a lot of debate surrounding the Common Core standards throughout the country. But sometimes, all the political noise can make us forget about the main goal of these standards. Do they really do a better job of preparing kids for college and careers? And if not, what’s stopping them?

This week, the Southern Education Desk has been looking at the standards and how they’re being implemented across the South.

Girls Rock summer camp participants.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Let me tell you about this cool, new band. You may not have heard of them yet — they’re called Sorrow Sap. They’re from New Orleans, and they have a fresh new sound… which might be because they started playing together earlier this week.

Oh, and they’re all under the age of 16.

wikicommons

Since the debate over the noise ordinance came to a standstill last April, live music advocates and neighborhood groups are stuck with an unlikely piece of legislation to deal with sound in the city:  zoning.

It’s early evening on Frenchmen Street, and the doors of this bar are wide open. Tourists are drifting in and out, and the music is free. It’s also illegal.

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