Nina Feldman

Special to the Southern Education Desk

Over the last two years, there has been a lot of debate surrounding the Common Core standards throughout the country. But sometimes, all the political noise can make us forget about the main goal of these standards. Do they really do a better job of preparing kids for college and careers? And if not, what’s stopping them?

This week, the Southern Education Desk has been looking at the standards and how they’re being implemented across the South.

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Since the debate over the noise ordinance came to a standstill last April, live music advocates and neighborhood groups are stuck with an unlikely piece of legislation to deal with sound in the city:  zoning.

It’s early evening on Frenchmen Street, and the doors of this bar are wide open. Tourists are drifting in and out, and the music is free. It’s also illegal.

Bike Easy

Bike lanes and the number of cyclists are growing steadily around New Orleans, and that means the chance for bike-related accidents is growing, too. Crashes, injuries and fatalities remain high. Lots of drivers aren’t used to so many bikers on the road, and many bikers don’t obey the laws.

There’s a name for this type of confusion and the frustration it causes: Bike Lash.

Nina Feldman has the story on why there's confusion about sharing the road in New Orleans, and what to do about it.

Nina Feldman / WWNO

On Wednesday afternoon, the Crescent City Farmers’ Market opened in the historic French Market. This is the fourth weekly market that Crescent City Farmers Market operates citywide — but the French Quarter location makes this one different than the rest.

The French Market in New Orleans has been running since 1791. For a couple of centuries, it provided the French Quarter and local community with fresh meats and produce.

Nina Feldman / WWNO

Everything about the Southern Food and Beverage Museum is a tribute to the legacy of food in southern states — even its physical building.

Architect Jonathan Tate says the new SOFAB building took on a number of identities over the years. It was originally the Dryades Market. During WWII it was a motor pool for the military; it was a jeweler and the Ocean Seafood Market.

“What we did here in terms of the design is peel all of that away, so what you see here is what the market might’ve looked like in the 1930s,” said Tate.

Jason Saul / WWNO

Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard in Central City has recently seen a lot of redevelopment. This Monday, the new location of the Southern Food and Beverage Museum opens its doors. Other large-scale projects are underway, too, and developers expect them to bring new life to the area.

But O.C. Haley has seen a slower resurgence than some other nearby commercial districts. Why has it been so hard to bring business back to this boulevard?

Carol Bebelle says she started coming to Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. when she was a little girl.

On Thursday the New Orleans City Council voted to change the definition of transient vacation rentals. Proponents say the change will make it easier to enforce the existing laws that prohibit short-term vacation rentals.

Nina Feldman / WWNO

Photos from the second day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, presented by Shell. Saturday, April 26, 2014.

Nina Feldman / WWNO

Photos from the opening day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival presented by Shell.

Nina Feldman / WWNO

In August of last year, O. Perry Walker and L.B. Landry High Schools combined to form one larger school in a state-of-the-art facility.

The merger of the two Algiers high schools, now called L.B. Landry–O.P. Walker College and Career Preparatory High School, was controversial among residents and alumni: public debate raged over everything from student uniforms to the school's official name.

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