Janaya Williams

Alexandra Garreton

According to numbers from the US Census and the IRS, 236,970 people left Louisiana between the summer of 2005 and the summer of 2006, mostly because of Hurricane Katrina.

Census details can’t tell who is a former resident returning and who’s new, but as of last year, the state had only recovered about 100,000 people, less than half of those who left. Whether it's abandoned houses or empty chairs at the dinner table, New Orleans is rebuilding around a conspicuous absence.

This week on The Debris, stories of people and things missing from, and just missing, New Orleans.

lden Richard teaches cybersecurity to a group of educators from around the U.S.

Tuesday was the first day of summer camp at the University of New Orleans, but there will be no letters home to Mom and Dad — this one is a summer camp for teachers. It is the second year of the GenCyber program.

Fred Benenson / Flickr

Fusion writer Cara Rose DeFabio has earned the unofficial title of "emoji scholar." That's because DeFabio pays very close attention to the details of how people use emojis to express emotion in text messages and to represent their unique identities online.

Louisiana's controversial Marriage and Conscience Act failed to win approval in Baton Rouge this session. The bill would have prohibited the state from punishing businesses for having religious beliefs that say "marriage is between one man and one woman." Critics of the bill say it would have allowed businesses to discriminate against gays and lesbians.

After the the bill failed, Governor Bobby Jindal stepped in and issued an executive order to accomplish the intent of the bill.

Ras Asan

Derrius Quarles and Ras Asan are co-founders of the education funding start-up Million Dollar Scholar.

Growing up in Chicago with few resources, Derrius Quarles shocked everyone when he took the initiative and won over a million dollars in scholarships and awards to attend college. As an undergraduate at Morehouse College, he met Ras Asan, and the two decided to take Derrius' know-how to more students who could use it.

Frank Gruber / Flickr

Steve Case is one of the founders of the technology company AOL. This week, he’s leading a bus tour across five Southern Cities to get a closer look at local startup businesses. On Friday, the Rise of the Rest bus tour makes a day-long stop in New Orleans.

Adam Norris / UNO

The self-appointed Google "Security Princess," Parisa Tabriz, has worked on information security for nearly a decade. She started as a "hired hacker" software engineer for Google's security team. As an engineer, she found and closed security holes in Google's products, and taught other engineers how to do the same.

A new do-it-yourself makerspace, workshop, and design studio, IDIYA, had its grand opening Thursday in Broadmoor.

The “DIY” in the name is for “do-it-yourself.” For a monthy membership fee, makers, innovators, and crafters gain access to all of the tools in the Idiya building.

Jim McKenna is the operations manager at Idiya. He gives an overview of some of the tools available for members to use:

Janaya Williams / WWNO

Tulane University hosted the second annual New Orleans Mini Maker Faire on Saturday.

Maker Faires are growing in popularity around the country. They’re described as part science fair, part county fair, and “the greatest show and tell on earth.”

While they mainly showcase do-it-yourselfers exploring new technologies, the faires also also draw people experimenting in science, engineering, art, and performance.

Janaya Williams / WWNO

Over the weekend, New Orleans held its second annual Mini Maker Faire at Tulane University.

The maker faire this year was a showcase for inventors and innovators of all stripes. Everything was on display — from drones and robots to glittered shoes and handmade flower garlands.

Scott Thomas is a co-producer of the faire. He says being a “maker” is not just about technology.