Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian is the host of Where Y’Eat and the Community Impact series at WWNO.

Each week, Ian shares his commentary on the intriguing food culture of New Orleans and south Louisiana with WWNO’s Where Y’Eat. He also shines light on the difference that innovative nonprofits are making across the New Orleans region through WWNO’s Community Impact series, interviewing nonprofit leaders and the people they serve.  Ian first became a WWNO contributor in 2009. He is a freelance journalist and a published author. A native of Rhode Island, Ian is a graduate of Rutgers University. He has lived in New Orleans since 1999.

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What do you do when you see an unfamiliar face? The more I get around Louisiana, the more I think the answer is, you stuff it.

Ian McNulty

Food writer Ian McNulty on a surpiring new restaurant in New Orleans that's giving the notion of fusion a good name.

Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty

Conjure an image of elegant decay, New Orleans style, and what comes to mind might look a lot like Feelings Café.

This is a restaurant found in the vestiges of a plantation established in the 1700s, and it retains the feel of a French country house even in the midst of its increasingly busy Marigny neighborhood. Framed in faded masonry, splashed with green fronds and steeped in a 40-watt glow, Feelings Café has been prized as much for this evocative ambiance as for its French and Creole cooking.

Ian McNulty

It was called a happy hour, but at this one the talk wasn’t so much about office politics or romantic prospects. Rather, the chatter centered on who had ever tried this and that fish before and, after tentative nibbles or bold gulps, how they all measured up to better-known staples of the Gulf Coast seafood menu.

Ian McNulty

Ask chefs to prepare one of their favorite steak dishes, and they may not go anywhere near the grill or the broiler. Instead, many of them will start chopping up meat for beef tartare, the classic French dish served raw.

This cold dish has had a warm spot in the hearts of many chefs and nostalgic gourmets for a long time, and now beef tartare is starting to gain wider appreciation and get some star treatment across a wide range of New Orleans restaurants.

Ian McNulty

Father’s Day, food and being there when the stories start percolating around the table.

Dad cooked a lot of the breakfasts when I was growing up. Pancakes were usually the order of the day, but no matter what he was making the meal usually included a little baloney.

Cooking seemed to put dad in the mood for stories, some about his days in the army, some about the dubious adventures he and his brothers got into when they were young. As the syrup and butter went on the pancakes, so the exaggeration and embroidery built these stories up to Paul Bunyan proportions.

Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty

Just where is “local?” In the food world these days, the answer is everywhere.

Local is emblazoned on your grocery store ad and woven across your restaurant menu. It’s at the core of the growing network of farmers markets, and local is fueling the explosion of new cottage industry producers and specialty suppliers. Local food is big, and around New Orleans it’s booming.

When it comes to the question what is local, however, the answer is changing, and in some very interesting ways. This month in particular is a good time to catch up on what’s new.

Ian McNulty


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