Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

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Education
12:29 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Voices From The WWNO Listening Post: Back To School

A student sits down at our Listening Post to talk about education.
Kate Richardson WWNO

WWNO's new community media project, the Listening Post, has spent the last few weeks collecting commentaries from around the city on the subject of education.

Listening Post recording devices have been present at the Norman Mayer Library in Gentilly and the HeadQuarters Barbershop on Broad Street. And the mobile Listening Post went to the Bard Early College New Orleans program for high schoolers, and our very own Culture Collision event.

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Community
11:42 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Listening Post: Add Your Voice On Healthcare

Hey New Orleans, let's talk about local news!

Question of the Week

The Listening Post Questions for September 5 - 19

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Audubon Aquarium
4:20 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Three More Endangered Penguins Hatch At Audubon Aquarium

One of the Aquarium's 34 endangered African Black-footed penguins. Audubon has raised 46 chicks since the Aquarium opened in 1990.
Jason Saul WWNO

Six African Black-footed Penguins born earlier this year have just joined the adults, full-time, in the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas' display. Darwin Long, senior aviculturist at the Aquarium, says the juveniles have shed their down, grown their water-proof plumage, and are ready to swim with the grown-ups.

“They’re going to get in little fights here and there, nothing serious. But it’s mainly: 'Hey, this is who’s who. This is where to go and where not to go.' You can see how they kind of hang out together. This is kind of like the adolescent shore over here.”

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Environment
6:00 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Levee Board Takes On Oil Industry Over Damage To Delta

New Orleans' levee board is suing energy companies for damaging the Mississippi River delta by cutting canals through the marshland. The canals let in sea water, which kills marshes, eroding the city's protective buffer against storms. A map of the delta.
Frank Relle

 

Eight years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans has a new flood protection system — $14 billion of levees, pumps and flood gates built by the Army Corps of Engineers. Residents, though, don't think that will be enough. The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority - East, the local levee board, basically, says that as sea levels rise and wetlands down river get washed away, New Orleans will need more help.

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Economy
12:31 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

New Orleans Index At Eight: Highs And Lows As The City Moves Beyond Rebuilding

Hurricane Katrina makes landfall, 2005.
NASA

Before Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed, the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center documented neighborhoods, and tracked social and economic indicators in the city.

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Politics
8:45 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Lens: Jindal's Use Of Rainy Day Fund May Leave Next Governor Dry

Governor Bobby Jindal vowed not to raise taxes, of any type. Instead, he has maintained the budget with spending cuts, meaning deep cuts in areas like higher education and health care.

Tyler Bridges — a reporter at The Lens, New Orleans’ investigative newsroom — has been looking into another way the governor has been able to balance the budget. Bridges says Jindal has largely drained public funds for economic development, taking hundreds of millions from the Rainy Day fund and the so-called "mega-development" fund.

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Environment
1:11 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Purple Martins And Their Causeway Summer Roost

The last of the purple martins swarming near the Causeway bridge before roosting for the night. Most of the birds have already headed to South America.
frankrelle.com

The end of summer means back to school, back to the grindstone, back from vacation. And for millions of birds, it means time to fly south for the winter.

One particular type of bird — the purple martin — has spent the summer preparing for that journey under the Causeway bridge. Right where the south shore connects to the Causeway, tens of thousands of the birds have maintained a roost, with a second roost further along the bridge. They sleep under it, flying in right at sunset. The last summer stragglers are now getting ready for their flight south.

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New Orleans Saints
7:15 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Legendary Saints Game Announcer Jerry Romig Reflects On His Career

Jerry Romig at his home, holding his Saints Hall of Fame trophy and a copy of the Aug. 16 Baton Rouge Advocate editorial celebrating his career.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

Friday night's pre-season Saints game against the Oakland Raiders was a landmark event.

Not for the players on the field, so much as for the man in the announcing booth.

Jerry Romig has called more than 440 Saints games, in his 44-year history with the team, and this one was his last. Now, his son Mark Romig will take over the job.

Romig is a veteran broadcaster beyond football, having played key roles at WDSU and in the co-founding of New Orleans public television station WLAE.

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Community
8:24 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Listening Post: Voices From A Central City Porch

A Central City resident speaks her mind at the Listening Post
Eve Troeh

This month WWNO launches a new project called The Listening Post. With the help of local artist Jacques Duffourc, we’ve made three portable recording stations that can move around the city. We’ll host occasional events where anyone can sit down to talk.

And we’ll… well… listen.

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Development
5:20 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Tulane Avenue Progress Too Slow For Some Businesses, Residents

Sun sets on Tulane Avenue, where new business and the promise of redevelopment mix with longstanding crime and poverty.
Ted Jackson Nola.com

City officials and developers have big plans for Tulane Avenue. The rough patch of old Airline Highway will hold two new hospitals, and a planned biomedical corridor. It’s slated to have fewer lanes of traffic and new landscaping, too. But, change is slow. Some residents and business owners who have invested in the neighborhood feel let down by the seedy motels and high crime that persist on Tulane Avenue.

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