Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

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Community
11:29 am
Fri August 29, 2014

Katrina/Sandy Website Offers Comparisons In Resilience

The Sandy/Katrina Platform Compares Experiences and Context of Disaster and Recovery
Lusia Dantas www.landofopportunityinteractive.com

Luisa Dantas created a Hurricane Katrina-related website called Land of Opportunity, which accompanies a documentary film of the same name. It chronicles ongoing challenges of disaster recovery and resilience.

The newest feature is a timeline that compares and contrasts stories of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Sandy. 

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NOPD
1:55 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

New Orleans Makes Big Push To Get More Cops On The Streets

After a hiring freeze caused by a budget crisis, New Orleans is now struggling to replace the roughly 100 officers a year it loses to retirements and officers quitting.
Rusty Costanza Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 1:08 pm

New Orleans is still reeling from another spate of violence last weekend, when five people were killed by gunfire and 11 wounded, including two toddlers. The city has launched high-profile campaigns to address gun violence, but a big part of the problem is an acute shortage of police.

Karen Rogers lives in the lower 9th Ward, where a recent drive-by shooting left two people dead and several more wounded. Police say it was drug-related.

"This is not the first time [I've heard gunshots]," says Rogers. "This is the first time to actually see people murdered and shot."

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Features
9:47 am
Fri August 8, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: Anniversary Of An Epidemic

Workers display rat-trapping equipment in New Orleans, circa 1914.
U.S. Public Health Service National Library of Medicine

At a time when the Ebola virus is causing panic throughout the world, and has prompted dire warnings from international public health officials, we're revisiting a plague of old: The Plague.

For this month's "Cityscapes" piece on Nola.com, Tulane University's Richard Campanella focused on one of New Orleans's own epidemics. This month marks the 100th anniversary of the bubonic plague outbreak in New Orleans.

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WWNO
12:32 pm
Thu August 7, 2014

Interview With Tim Franks, Host Of BBC Newshour

Tim Franks, host of BBC Newshour.
Credit BBC

News Director Eve Troeh welcomed our newest program to the air with an interview with Tim Franks, the host of BBC Newshour, airing weekdays at 2 p.m.

Eve Troeh: Tell us a little bit about the production day for Newshour; when we hear you here at 2 p.m. it’s going to be much later obviously in London. When does the day start for you and how does it begin?

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Arts & Culture
1:51 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Cinematic Culture In August: Henry Griffin On New Orleans' Film Scene

State Theatre Traverse City Creative Commons

Head into the cool, dark spaces so nice in the summertime: movie theaters. Henry Griffin, our regular guest, joins Eve Troeh in the WWNO studios to give a few cinematic happenings for the month of August.

Satchmo Summer Fest includes screenings of Louis Armstrong film and TV clips, called "Cinematic Satch," playing August 1-3 at the US Mint. More on that and the full festival schedule right here.

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Features
11:38 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: A New Orleans Childhood At Monkey Hill

Playing at Monkey Hill is one of the essentials of a New Orleans childhood.
Credit Mark Gstohl / Flickr

Local geographer Richard Campanella has spent the last 20 years studying the city's topography and says that, unlike other cities, New Orleans' highest and lowest points are man-made creations.

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Education
7:35 am
Tue June 17, 2014

What Will Come Of New Orleans' Empty, Damaged School Buildings?

The abandoned Alfred E. Priestley school has not hosted students in decades.
Michael DeMocker Nola.com / The Times-Picayune

In a recent story, Nola.com / The Times-Picayune education reporter Danielle Dreilinger took a look at the many empty buildings and vacant lots still owned by the Orleans Parish School Board. Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent floods damaged many school properties, though some sat vacant and rotting long before the storm.

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Features
7:51 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On New Orleans' Sauvé's Crevasse Flood Of 1849

New Orleans was inundated by Mississippi River waters in the spring of 1849. This oil painting by Elizabeth Lamoisse shows Canal Street at the time of the flood. "Landscape" by Elizabeth Lamoisse, 1848 - 1849, from the Louisiana State Museum.
Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: James Stram

James Stram.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Business
8:34 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Brown Shrimp Season Opens With High Prices, But Future Remains Uncertain

At the Chauvin, Louisiana "Blessing of the Fleet" in April, the T-Kim & James led the procession.
Jesse Hardman

This week Louisiana opened its inshore waters for shrimping. Boats around the state are heading out hoping for a big catch of brown shrimp in the bayous.

It’s a late start to the season, due to the long, cold winter, meaning less time for shrimpers to make money. But some good news for shrimp boat captains: prices are high.

In some cases, prices are double what they were last year. After years of setbacks, shrimpers could use a break.

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