Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's first-ever News Director, hired to start the local news department in 2013. In this role, Eve assigns and edits the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana, including WWNO's Coastal Desk and education reporting. She edits the podcast and radio series "Tripod: New Orleans @300," and created, hosted and edited WWNO's Katrina +10 podcast and radio segment, "The Debris."  She also oversees special projects like community reporting tool "The Listening Post," and independent producer contributions like the Localore project "Unprisoned," and guides the newsroom in reporting stories of significance for national and international outlets. Follow on Twitter @evetroeh 

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NOPD Task Forces Diminished, Consolidated

Mar 26, 2015
wikimedia.org

The City of New Orleans has announced new efforts to improve safety in the French Quarter, including deploying half of the NOPD’s special task force – eight officers – to that neighborhood each day. Robert Morris of Uptown Messenger recently reported for the Gambit on the status of NOPD task force work city-wide.

On a sunny Sunday in New Orleans, barbecue stands and ice-filled coolers line a closed-off street. Central City is not a tourist zone, but people pack in — many with cameras and long lenses. A mass of color begins to move.

Nola.com The Times-Picayune Archive

Every month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com. In this edition the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into the former Chinatown, and the history of Chinese-Americans in the city.

Chinese immigrants were first brought to Louisiana in hopes that they would work as inexpensive labor for sugar plantations after the Civil War. When that didn't work out, they began to move to the city.

Professor John Renne of UNO Planning and Urban Studies has more on the Front Yard Initiative, a pilot program to help homeowners turn concrete into green space. The idea, he says, has social, environmental and property value impact.

A new report from the Data Center shows New Orleans’ rate of child poverty is still just as high as it was at the time of Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, almost ten years ago. Senior Researcher Dr. Vicki Mack tells us about how New Orleans ranks nationally in child poverty, and some of the far-reaching consequences.

Mack notes that about 39 percent of children in New Orleans live in poverty. That puts New Orleans about ninth nationally, next to cities likes Cleveland and Toledo, even though the metro area's overall economy is better than those cities.

G. E. Arnold, NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune archive

In this month's Cityscapes column at Nola.com, Tulane Professor of Geography Richard Campanella explores some very real consequences of draining urban wetlands for building.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh visited Vietnam on assignment to report on the effects of climate change in a place with water challenges similar to New Orleans. She says it was an adventure unlike any she has recently experienced.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

The art show “Above Canal: Rights and Revival” honors New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement legacy with archival photos of local actions, activists and leaders. This history is explored alongside contemporary art that speaks to themes of neighborhood change over time.

Mardi Gras is about ephemera, the thrill of the chase. In New Orleans, that's cajoling a strand of special glass beads or a glittered coconut from the hands of a stranger high up on a parade float. But the moment that trinket is nabbed, the recipient might think: Now what am I going to do with this?

Cajun Mardi Gras, however, in the small towns south and west of New Orleans, raises no such question. Because what you aim to catch is very useful. And edible.

It's a squawking, flapping live chicken.

Richard Campanella

As NBC announces the 6-month, unpaid suspension of news anchor Brian Williams, controversy over the truth of many of his high-profile reporting trips continues.

While the scandal erupted related to questions about Iraq, in 2003, it has also brought into question Williams’ 2005 reporting in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Among other claims, Williams reported floodwaters around his French Quarter hotel.

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