Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR. Follow on Twitter @evetroeh 

Ways to Connect

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

On the other side of the globe, Louisiana has found sympathetic ears in Vietnam. That nation also has a below-sea-level region at the mouth of a great river. Increased conversation and meetings aim to find out how shared geography might lead to shared solutions. 

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

New Orleans' most visited neighborhood rarely sees the type of violent crime that plagues other parts of the city. Recently, several high-profile robberies have rattled the region and led to criticism of the police department and the mayor, both of whom are rethinking safety measures.

Over the next few weeks, more and more visitors will roam the city's famous French Quarter, drinks in hand, for Mardi Gras. In less than 2 square miles, the French Quarter combines hotels, restaurants, street performers, and all-night bars with historic homes and tight-knit neighbors.

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan addressed the annual lunch for the nonprofit Bureau of Governmental Research on Thursday.

He called New Orleans an example for the nation in school innovation, and cited a long list of statistics in achievement improvements since 2005. Then, 60 percent of students attended a failing school, while that number has dropped to 5 percent today.

Duncan noted that New Orleanians, more than most, know the pain that comes with drastic school change. In the battle for better public education, he said, "you are absolutely winning."

Eve Troeh / WWNO

Riding southwest from Saigon, the visible landscape of the Mekong delta appears immediately similar to the Mississippi delta. Green plants are everywhere, cut through with muddy water. Of course the tropical climate of Vietnam means there are coconut palms and other exotic plant life.

A major challenge of the working delta is controlling the mix of freshwater and saltwater, both on a wide scale and on an individual farm scale. The canals serve as dividing lines, as do a series of sluice gates.

Reporter's Notebook: WWNO In Saigon

Nov 14, 2014
Eve Troeh / WWNO

Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City, also known as Saigon, has become an Asian mega-city. And it’s surrounded and defined by water. Districts here are often separated by bridges, crossing one of the many rivers that run through the city on their way to the Mekong Delta. It’s a bustling place, as you’d expect with eight million or so residents (and growing). Rush hour brings an onslaught of motorbikes and cars, flowing like their own river through the city.

Cityscapes: When St. Bernard Made Cars

Nov 7, 2014
TheHenryFord.org

In this month's Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune, geographer Richard Campanella chooses another industrial subject. The Ford Motor Co. plant in Arabi, along the Mississippi River in St. Bernard Parish, employed hundreds of local workers, starting in the early 1920s.

The Urban League of Greater New Orleans has a short guide for voters in Tuesday's election, focused on the 14 state constitutional amendments on the ballot. WWNO News Director Eve Troeh spoke with the Urban League's Ricardo Thomas about the guide. 

Click here for the voting guide.

How To Learn To Love The Disaster Industry

Oct 31, 2014
Edward Dai/Epoch Times

Disasters are causing more and more damage, and the federal government is spending more and more money to rebuild afterwards.

But before the construction crew can begin repairs, homeowners face months-long delays and poor customer service in the preliminary stages of the application process. Some homeowners even complain that the rebuilding process has become as traumatic as the storm itself.

The Other Industry That's Too Big to Fail

Oct 30, 2014
Eve Troeh

The New Jersey Sandy recovery service center had so few chairs that some customers had to wait while standing in long lines. The firm used software taken off the Internet and full of bugs. Homeowners were directed to make appointments through a call center, but employees were never told when they would show up.

That is what Sandy victims faced when they came to one of nine intake centers set up to distribute long-term federal aid to homeowners, David, a former employee, said. He said he and his colleagues wanted to help, but met repeated obstacles.

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