Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana, including WWNO's Coastal Desk and education reporting. She edits the podcast and radio series "Tripod: New Orleans @300," and created, hosted and edited WWNO's Katrina +10 podcast and radio segment "The Debris."  She guides the newsroom in reporting stories of significance for national and international outlets. Follow on Twitter @evetroeh 

Ways to Connect

Eve Troeh / WWNO

Crowds filled the Fairgrounds as the 46th annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival started its annual seven days of festing.

From a homegrown showcase for local talent, Jazz Fest has grown to include top national pop stars (which the festival officially calls “guest artists") alongside New Orleans' favorite jazz, blues, rock, gospel, hip hop, brass band and other talent. The nonprofit Jazz and Heritage Foundation has produced the festival in partnership with international production company AEG since 2004.

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On A 7th Ward Puzzle

Apr 10, 2015
Nola.com/The Times-Picayune

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into a bizarre street pattern that pops up in the 7th Ward.

Seen from above, he says, this particular parcel of land and the way its streets intersect looks like the floor of a messy tailor's shop, scraps and remnants rather than any type of clear-cut pattern.

Jason Saul

Hear that?

It’s a pop, the sound of air rushing in. A thick, heady smell. Like when you open a vacuum-sealed pack of coffee and chicory.

Did you wince? So did we. But the seal has been broken on New Orleans clichés — in newsrooms across the city and, yes, the nation and presumably the world, journalists are staring down blank whiteboards with the headline: Ten-Year Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

NOPD Task Forces Diminished, Consolidated

Mar 26, 2015
wikimedia.org

The City of New Orleans has announced new efforts to improve safety in the French Quarter, including deploying half of the NOPD’s special task force – eight officers – to that neighborhood each day. Robert Morris of Uptown Messenger recently reported for the Gambit on the status of NOPD task force work city-wide.

On a sunny Sunday in New Orleans, barbecue stands and ice-filled coolers line a closed-off street. Central City is not a tourist zone, but people pack in — many with cameras and long lenses. A mass of color begins to move.

Nola.com The Times-Picayune Archive

Every month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com. In this edition the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into the former Chinatown, and the history of Chinese-Americans in the city.

Chinese immigrants were first brought to Louisiana in hopes that they would work as inexpensive labor for sugar plantations after the Civil War. When that didn't work out, they began to move to the city.

Professor John Renne of UNO Planning and Urban Studies has more on the Front Yard Initiative, a pilot program to help homeowners turn concrete into green space. The idea, he says, has social, environmental and property value impact.

A new report from the Data Center shows New Orleans’ rate of child poverty is still just as high as it was at the time of Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, almost ten years ago. Senior Researcher Dr. Vicki Mack tells us about how New Orleans ranks nationally in child poverty, and some of the far-reaching consequences.

Mack notes that about 39 percent of children in New Orleans live in poverty. That puts New Orleans about ninth nationally, next to cities likes Cleveland and Toledo, even though the metro area's overall economy is better than those cities.

G. E. Arnold, NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune archive

In this month's Cityscapes column at Nola.com, Tulane Professor of Geography Richard Campanella explores some very real consequences of draining urban wetlands for building.

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