Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

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NolaVie
11:21 am
Fri February 20, 2015

From The Mississippi To The Mekong: A Conversation With WWNO's Eve Troeh

A field of green onions, with a structure typical to the rural areas of the Mekong River delta, in the late afternoon near the coast.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh visited Vietnam on assignment to report on the effects of climate change in a place with water challenges similar to New Orleans. She says it was an adventure unlike any she has recently experienced.

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Arts & Culture
3:40 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

'Above Canal: Rights and Revival' Explores New Orleans' Civil Rights Legacy And Neighborhood Change

Jeanne Nathan of CANO and Keith Duncan in front of one of Duncan's works, "Times-Picayune," on display at the Myrtle Banks building, 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., through Feb. 28
Eve Troeh WWNO

The art show “Above Canal: Rights and Revival” honors New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement legacy with archival photos of local actions, activists and leaders. This history is explored alongside contemporary art that speaks to themes of neighborhood change over time.

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Arts & Culture
4:18 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Forget Beads: Cajun Mardi Gras Means A Grand, Drunken Chicken Chase

The annual Courir de Mardi Gras in Mamou, La., in February 2008. In the Cajun country tradition, revelers go house to house, collecting ingredients for gumbo from local families. Here, the host tosses a live chicken from a rooftop for the participants to catch — which can be tricky, considering the festivities often begin with early-morning drinking.
Carol Guzy Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 17, 2015 5:38 pm

Mardi Gras is about ephemera, the thrill of the chase. In New Orleans, that's cajoling a strand of special glass beads or a glittered coconut from the hands of a stranger high up on a parade float. But the moment that trinket is nabbed, the recipient might think: Now what am I going to do with this?

Cajun Mardi Gras, however, in the small towns south and west of New Orleans, raises no such question. Because what you aim to catch is very useful. And edible.

It's a squawking, flapping live chicken.

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Coastal Desk
2:39 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Did The French Quarter Flood After Katrina? Yes, About Nine Percent Of It

A photo taken in the immediate days after Hurricane Katrina shows floodwaters on Canal Street, crossing into the French Quarter.
Richard Campanella

As NBC announces the 6-month, unpaid suspension of news anchor Brian Williams, controversy over the truth of many of his high-profile reporting trips continues.

While the scandal erupted related to questions about Iraq, in 2003, it has also brought into question Williams’ 2005 reporting in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Among other claims, Williams reported floodwaters around his French Quarter hotel.

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Arts & Culture
1:12 pm
Fri February 6, 2015

'Clementine Hunter: A Sketchbook' Publishes Unseen Works By The Self-Taught Artist

Cover of Clementine Hunter sketchbook
UNO Press

Curator Bradley Sumrall at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art has more than 20 works by renowned Louisiana self-taught artist Clementine Hunter on display for the first time. They’re individual pages from an early sketchbook by the artist, from just a few years after she first began painting.

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Coastal Desk
7:16 am
Thu February 5, 2015

Delta Blues Part 3: Better Together

Boat on the river in Can Tho, the largest city in the Mekong Delta.
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

On the other side of the globe, Louisiana has found sympathetic ears in Vietnam. That nation also has a below-sea-level region at the mouth of a great river. Increased conversation and meetings aim to find out how shared geography might lead to shared solutions. 

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Coastal Desk
10:19 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Delta Blues Part 2: When Life Gives You Saltwater, Make Shrimp Ponds

Farmers in Vietnam's Mekong delta adapt to climate change as saltwater creeps onto their land.
Jesse Hardman WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

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Latest News
4:37 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

French Quarter Sees Violent Crime Surge; Residents Demand Changes

New Orleans police officer Patrick Schneider patrols Bourbon Street in the heart of the French Quarter on Saturday.
Jason Saul WWNO

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 10:25 am

New Orleans' most visited neighborhood rarely sees the type of violent crime that plagues other parts of the city. Recently, several high-profile robberies have rattled the region and led to criticism of the police department and the mayor, both of whom are rethinking safety measures.

Over the next few weeks, more and more visitors will roam the city's famous French Quarter, drinks in hand, for Mardi Gras. In less than 2 square miles, the French Quarter combines hotels, restaurants, street performers, and all-night bars with historic homes and tight-knit neighbors.

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Education
7:27 pm
Thu December 11, 2014

Education Secretary Arne Duncan Says New Orleans Is Winning The Battle For Public Education

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan addressed the annual lunch for the nonprofit Bureau of Governmental Research on Thursday.

He called New Orleans an example for the nation in school innovation, and cited a long list of statistics in achievement improvements since 2005. Then, 60 percent of students attended a failing school, while that number has dropped to 5 percent today.

Duncan noted that New Orleanians, more than most, know the pain that comes with drastic school change. In the battle for better public education, he said, "you are absolutely winning."

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Coastal Desk
6:01 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Reporter's Notebook: Exploring The Mekong Delta

A canal in the Mekong delta.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

Riding southwest from Saigon, the visible landscape of the Mekong delta appears immediately similar to the Mississippi delta. Green plants are everywhere, cut through with muddy water. Of course the tropical climate of Vietnam means there are coconut palms and other exotic plant life.

A major challenge of the working delta is controlling the mix of freshwater and saltwater, both on a wide scale and on an individual farm scale. The canals serve as dividing lines, as do a series of sluice gates.

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