Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's first-ever News Director, hired to start the local news department in 2013. In this role, Eve assigns and edits the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana, including WWNO's Coastal Desk and education reporting. She edits the podcast and radio series "Tripod: New Orleans @300," and created, hosted and edited WWNO's Katrina +10 podcast and radio segment, "The Debris."  She also oversees special projects like community reporting tool "The Listening Post," and independent producer contributions like the Localore project "Unprisoned," and guides the newsroom in reporting stories of significance for national and international outlets. Follow on Twitter @evetroeh 

Ways to Connect

Courtesy Magnolia Pictures

A new documentary feature film, "Presenting Princess Shaw," follows the life of Samantha Montgomery, a New Orleans singer and elder care nursing assistant, as she goes from her own obscure YouTube channel to starring in a video by international music mashup artist Kutiman.

Copyright 2016 WWNO-FM. To see more, visit WWNO-FM.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month we hear from Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. This time, WWNO’s Eve Troeh talks to him about how New Orleans started “going Greek” in architecture, with the Greek Revival movement hitting the city in the early 1800s.

The Pitot House on Bayou St. John is an example of New Orleans' original Creole architecture.
Infrogmation / Flickr

Every month Richard Campanella talks to WWNO about his Cityscapes column for NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune.

Courtesy University of New Orleans

After a public search, the University of New Orleans has a new president. Dr. John Nicklow has been named by the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.

Image courtesy Library of Congress, Richard Campanella

Richard Campanella, Professor of Geography at Tulane School of Architecture and author of the monthly Cityscapes column at Nola.com, sits down with News Director Eve Troeh for their monthly interview.

This month Campanella talks about how and why New Orleans was divided into three municipalities in the 1830s due to cultural differences of its many populations.


Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

WWNO and producer Eve Abrams have launched Unprisoned: Stories From the System, a project exploring criminal justice and corrections in New Orleans, the most incarcerated place in the world.

Abrams sat down with News Director Eve Troeh to explain how people outside of prisons are being affected as profoundly as the people who are incarcerated.

Four state-of-the-art autopsy stations at the new Coroner's Office headquarters replace a converted embalming room in the old office, a former funeral home.
Courtesy George Hero Architects

There is a new three-story, $14.8 million headquarters for the New Orleans Coroner's Office and for Emergency Medical Services, built with funds from FEMA, community development block grants, and a public bond issue. It represents an evolution in services to the community, says Coroner Dr. Jeffrey Rouse.

Cityscapes: When Bourbon Street Was Elite

Jan 7, 2016
Getty Images

Each month Richard Campanella talks to WWNO about his Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune. This month: Bourbon Street.

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