Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's first-ever News Director, hired to start the local news department in 2013. In this role, Eve assigns and edits the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana, including WWNO's Coastal Desk and education reporting. She edits the podcast and radio series "Tripod: New Orleans @300," and created, hosted and edited WWNO's Katrina +10 podcast and radio segment, "The Debris."  She also oversees special projects like community reporting tool "The Listening Post," and independent producer contributions like the Localore project "Unprisoned," and guides the newsroom in reporting stories of significance for national and international outlets. Follow on Twitter @evetroeh 

Ways to Connect

Image courtesy Library of Congress, Richard Campanella

Richard Campanella, Professor of Geography at Tulane School of Architecture and author of the monthly Cityscapes column at Nola.com, sits down with News Director Eve Troeh for their monthly interview.

This month Campanella talks about how and why New Orleans was divided into three municipalities in the 1830s due to cultural differences of its many populations.


Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

WWNO and producer Eve Abrams have launched Unprisoned: Stories From the System, a project exploring criminal justice and corrections in New Orleans, the most incarcerated place in the world.

Abrams sat down with News Director Eve Troeh to explain how people outside of prisons are being affected as profoundly as the people who are incarcerated.

Four state-of-the-art autopsy stations at the new Coroner's Office headquarters replace a converted embalming room in the old office, a former funeral home.
Courtesy George Hero Architects

There is a new three-story, $14.8 million headquarters for the New Orleans Coroner's Office and for Emergency Medical Services, built with funds from FEMA, community development block grants, and a public bond issue. It represents an evolution in services to the community, says Coroner Dr. Jeffrey Rouse.

Cityscapes: When Bourbon Street Was Elite

Jan 7, 2016
Getty Images

Each month Richard Campanella talks to WWNO about his Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune. This month: Bourbon Street.

Ending The Reign Of Burl Cain: An In-Depth Interview

Jan 1, 2016
Blake Nelson Boyd

In January, 1995 Burl Cain became warden of the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. In his 20 years on the job, Cain became practically synonymous with the infamous prison plantation, known both for sweeping reforms based in a Christian ministry at the prison, and for frequent controversies over business deals involving inmate labor, goods and services.

In advance of the 2015 elections, Louisiana Cultural Vistas has been interviewing past Louisiana governors about what it takes to hold the state office.  Here, Edwin Edwards gives his take.

Katy Reckdahl/Juvenile Justice Information Project

At age 17, Henry Montgomery went to jail for killing a deputy in Baton Rouge. He's been in jail ever since, serving a life sentence in Angola penitentiary with no possibility for parole.

On Tuesday the Supreme Court hears a case bearing his name: Montgomery v. Louisiana. Lawyers will make their arguments before the court about mandatory life sentencing for juveniles, specifically who should get a chance at freedom.

US Army Corps of Engineers

Labor Day has passed. And while it would be foolish to open your doors expecting any hint of autumn breeze, early September this year does bring a particularly needed respite.

We will not be hearing the K-word, and its accompanying R-word, several times each day. Local outlets did their heavy lifting, looking back and looking forward. The national camera crews have packed up and headed back. The hotels have emptied of the many visiting journalists, charity and nonprofit workers, experts and onlookers.

Undeterred by the devastation, second line clubs returned to New Orleans a few months after the flood, determined to uphold the city's cultural traditions. This photo is of the 2009 Prince of Wales second line parade.
Jason Saul

Well, we’ve made it. Almost. It’s been a long, hot summer and this is our last episode as we come up on the tenth anniversary of Katrina.

The city is abuzz with journalists and experts and NGOs and politicians. We thought we’d use this last bit of The Debris to explore a word they’re all using to talk about New Orleans: resilience.

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