State and National News

Secretary of State John Kerry has negotiated himself into the odd position of lobbying in support of investment in Iran.

As he tries to keep the Iran nuclear agreement on track in the final year of the Obama administration, Kerry has become personally involved in trying to help Iran get economic benefits out of the deal. That's no easy task and one that critics say is letting Iran off the hook.

During her tenure as secretary of state, Hillary Clinton violated department policies when she used a personal email account to conduct official business, a new report from the Office of the Inspector General for the State Department found.

The report, which was obtained by NPR's Susan Davis ahead of its public release, reads:

How refugees are resettled in the U.S.

20 hours ago
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Tracey Samuelson

The U.S. has resettled nearly 40,000 refugees since the beginning of October. Only about 2,500 of those have come from Syria. Even so, the State Department says the U.S. is on track to accept the 10,000 Syrian refugees President Obama pledged to take this year.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

You can't help but notice that Scott Pitnick has a big tattoo. It's a sperm with a long tail that winds down his right arm.

People sometimes stare. "And when I tell them what it is, they either are very interested or they pivot on their heel and walk away," says Pitnick, an evolutionary biologist at Syracuse University. "All eye contact ceases."

Some people just don't like talking about sperm. But not him. He's spent his career trying to unravel the mystery of giant sperm.

Ukrainian pilot and national hero Nadiya Savchenko has been released from Russia, where she has been held for almost two years.

Native American leaders and a U.S. State Department official are urging a French auction house to call off a sale of sacred art and artifacts.

The world is not ready for the next big pandemic. That's what health officials have been saying for years. If a deadly flu strain spreads around the globe, we could be in trouble.

This week the health leaders are trying to change that. They're gathering in Geneva for the World Health Organization's annual meeting, the 69th World Health Assembly. At the top of the agenda: reshaping WHO into an agency that can take action during a health emergency instead of just giving out advice.

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