State and National News

While political Washington is in a tizzy about the election and what it portends for the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is prepping for her operatic debut in Italian composer Gaetano Donizetti's "The Daughter of the Regiment."

For one night in November, the diminutive legal diva will play the non-singing role of the Duchess of Krakenthorp, a character akin to the dowagers in Marx Brothers movies.

Mexico City's Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera is handing out plastic whistles. A half-million of them. At three bucks a pop, he's hoping that women will use the whistles to scare off harassers on the packed public transportation system.

When the plan was announced this summer, it received a flurry of scathing criticism and mocking memes on social media. But city officials are moving forward and have been handing out the whistles by the thousands at subway and bus stops.

To find Mosul's cops, you drive to a gray dot of a village in an endless desert. The village, Mahana, was retaken from the Islamic State a few months ago and for now it's the police base for cops who left Mosul when ISIS took over more than two years ago.

Iraq's army and its allies are now battling their way through rural areas toward the larger prize of retaking Mosul. Helicopters buzz back and forth from the frontlines. Every breath is bitter with smoke from oil wells set alight by ISIS.

Make no mistake. Gloria Steinem, noted feminist and author, does not see that a woman elected to the White House automatically means a win for feminists or women.

"This is not all about biology, and I think we have to be careful to always say that, because if Sarah Palin were the president it wouldn't signify change," she tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "If President Obama did not represent the majority views of Americans and of African-Americans, he would not represent change as he does. So it isn't about simple biology. It's about what we represent."

When Rosley Espinoza's daughter was very young, in preschool, she started acting differently. She seemed distracted and would get in trouble at school.

"Lack of interest, teachers' notes coming home with behavior notes," Espinoza says, speaking in Spanish.

She says she asked school officials to evaluate her daughter, Citlali, for special education, but they didn't.

Scott Cohn

Wildfires are an unfortunate fact of life in California, and a five-year drought is only making matters worse. Since the beginning of this year, more than 5,300 fires have broken out in the state. That is a 16 percent jump from a year ago.

Starbucks doubles down on China

9 hours ago
Reema Khrais

Starbucks named executive Belinda Wong as its first CEO for China this week, and said it plans to have 5,000 stores in the country by 2021. With a middle class that is already larger than the population of the United States, China could be Starbucks' growth engine of the future.  

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Will honey bees stay sweet on North Dakota?

10 hours ago
Annie Baxter

It might seem surprising that North Dakota, one of the northernmost and coldest states in the nation, is the bees’ knees for honey production.

It produces more honey than any other state. In summertime, North Dakota's climate is just right. It's conducive to flowers’ production of nectar, which bees use to make honey.

“Warm days and cool nights are optimal for nectar secretion for a number of plants that honeybees visit. So that helps,” said Mark Sperry, owner of Sperry Apiaries in Kindred, North Dakota.

Marketplace Tech for Friday, October 21, 2016

10 hours ago

On today's show, we'll interview the CEO of Emotiv about the company's EEG headsets, a type of hardware that could one day be used  for everything from teaching better focus to controlling robotic limbs. Plus, we'll also play this week's Silicon Tally with Greta Johnsen, the co-host of the Nerdette podcast and a reporter and anchor at WBEZ.

If there's one rule that most parents cling to in the confusing, fast-changing world of kids and media, it's this one: No screens before age 2.

As of today, that rule is out the window.