News

Andre Natta / Southern Education Desk

Florida has about 650 charter schools. They're part of school districts but are privately managed and largely free of many of the rules governing traditional public schools. But as enrollment in charters has increased, so has the financial cost.

WFSU's Lynn Hatter reports for the Southern Education Desk that Tennessee and Georgia are also struggling to find ways to support their charter schools.

Chris Mickal

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina 10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections from First Responders. This series is based on oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

This episode features interviews with the 39th Infantry Brigade of the Arkansas Army National Guard, which was the first unit called after Katrina to back up the Louisiana National Guard.

Amy Jeffries / Southern Education Desk

The big push for charter schools in Louisiana started after Hurricane Katrina. The state's Recovery School District took over most of the public schools in New Orleans, and quickly issued charters.

With charter school enrollment up to nearly 3 million nationwide last year, Louisiana was still among the states adding the most students.

This week on Inside the Arts, the Joan Mitchell Center celebrates its Grand Opening and Artist-in-Residence Program.

Then, a love gift to the Crescent City from the land down under. Multi-award winning Australian music photographer Leon Morris releases his new book Homage: New Orleans. The coffee table book in honor of the 10th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is the photographer's journey of 20 years photographing the city's musical culture.

And, we round out with conversation with award-winning local artist Jax Frey.

Someone once likened Culture Collision to a trade show, but it’s so much more. This year, the annual happy-hour to kick off New Orleans’ vibrant cultural season is slated for Wednesday, September 2, from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Culture Collision 7 will take place at The National WWII Museum's U.S. Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, and is free and open to the public.

This week on The Reading Life: Cynthia Joyce, editor of Please Forward: How Blogging Reconnected New Orleans After Katrina, a terrific collection of writing that appeared online between 2005 and 2007. And Tony Dunbar talks about his new Tubby Dubonnet mystery, Night Watchman.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Charter schools are changing American education. Some say for the better, some say for the worse. This week the Southern Education Desk looks at the charter school movement throughout the south: the similarities and differences between states, and a glimpse at what's ahead. The series starts in New Orleans, the testing ground for the charter movement. Nearly all the city's public schools have been converted into charters: publicly funded, but privately run. Since then, a major lesson has emerged.

Lisa Richardson, left, is the Director of Research & Evaluation at the Institute of Women & Ethnic Studies. Denese Shervington, right, is its President & CEO.
StoryCorps

For a couple of years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans’ narrative belonged to the people who endured the storm and those who helped rebuild after it. But as time went on and the city recovered, things changed. New demographics emerged and people started talking about “the new New Orleans.”

These changes left many people, including psychiatrist Denese Shervington and urban anthropologist Lisa Richardson, wondering about the city’s new identity and their place in it.

Jesse Hardman

Lots of people who visit New Orleans today are surprised to find the city in such good shape. The rebuilding effort has been long, arduous, and largely successful in most areas (with a few notable exceptions, like the Lower 9th Ward).

New Orleans would not be where it is today without the students, church groups, retirees, professional organizations and lone good souls who gave their time and energy to rebuilding. At least a million people, by one count, and likely many millions. Newcomers poured into the city after the storm, and many became new New Orleanians.

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer interviews actor/singer-songwriter/composer Van Dyke Parks with live performance. Also, What the Frack, News of the Warm, and News of Secrets.

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