News

Blue Oak BBQ opened recently in Mid-City, the latest in a growing number of serious barbecue purveyors in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Is New Orleans a barbecue town? For a long time, the answer was generally, even if grudgingly, no. But times are changing.

Out To Lunch: Sun, Water And Dirt
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

In business, and other organizations, we hear about "mission drift." That's a condition where the organization loses track of what it set out to accomplish.

The way to re-focus is to get back to basics. That’s what we're doing today on Out to Lunch. We’re talking about three very basic elements: sunshine, water and dirt. And we’re looking at how we can harness these three elements to re-focus us on one of our missions as a city that we seem to have drifted away from — resurrecting the 9th Ward.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Wrong Place Wrong Time'

May 12, 2016
Claire Bangser / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Even as the price of oil drops, and offshore drilling slows down, huge amounts of crude oil keep flowing into Louisiana’s oil ports. The biggest is LOOP, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. It’s a major pass-through point for a lot of U.S. crude. But instead of heading out to refineries, oil is being stockpiled at LOOP.

Erica Falls.
Music Inside Out

She may have started 20 feet from stardom, but she’s gained a lot of ground in the meantime. Growing up in New Orleans’ 9th Ward, Erica Falls absorbed the sounds of everyone from Billy Eckstine and Ella Fitzgerald to the Sugar Hill Gang and the Ohio Players, to Roberta Flack and Steel Pulse.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The oil and gas downturn has resulted in a loss of about 12,000 jobs across Louisiana over the past year. Many of those jobs are concentrated in smaller metropolitan areas, like the Cajun city of Lafayette, which has lost the most. The city that once boomed as a result of oil and gas activity is now struggling to not go bust.

Asha Lane, high school senior.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Asha Lane is an 18-year-old senior at the International High School of New Orleans, a charter high school. Asha wanted to find out why New Orleans charter schools don’t always feel nurturing. We live in a dangerous city, but when does security feel unsafe?

Todd Ritondaro

Having just opened his gallery at 910 Royal Street, Frank Relle’s photographs now adorn the walls of the French Quarter. His techniques of manipulating light and location have lead him from swamps in nature to blighted properties in the city. What stories and thoughts lurk in this photographer’s mind? He sat down with Kelley Crawford for a chat.

This week on Inside the Arts, NOMA and the NOLA Project present Don Quixote in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden.  We talk with members of the cast. 

 Then, issues of coastal erosion and wetlands conservation take center stage as the 3rd Annual Wetlands Art Tour kicks off this weekend.  Tour organizer John Calhoun joins us. And, the experimental Taco Truck Theater project is back with a work in progress addressing immigration issues. Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. 

This week on The Reading Life: Historian Pamela Tyler explores 200 years of history in her new book, New Orleans Women and the Poydras Home: More Durable than Marble. Also Novelist, short story writer and essayist Ellen Gilchrist talks about hard won wisdom in Things Like the Truth:Out Of My Later Years.

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