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The Whole Goal in Half the Time!

42 minutes ago

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Katie Hunter-Lowrey

Since 2011, NOLA to Angola has been uniting people in a 170-mile solidarity bike ride from Municipal Court in the shadow of Orleans Parish Prison to Angola Prison, and that solidarity extends way beyond the miles trekked on the ride. The ride focuses on bringing people together, no matter what barriers separate them. NolaVie's Kelley Crawford speaks with Katie Hunter-Lowrey, one of the ride's organizers.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.

Paul Morigi

This is the first edition of TriPod Xtras- exclusive interviews with guests on topics of New Orleans history. Here, Laine Kaplan-Levenson speaks with journalist and author Cokie Roberts. A native New Orleanian, Roberts talks about her connection to the city, and its politics, starting with her Congressional parents. 

Fewer standardized tests and more arts and foreign language. Those are just some of the changes in a draft education plan the state released this week.

Like many states, Louisiana is changing education priorities because now it can. Last year President Obama signed a new education bill into law, replacing No Child Left Behind with the Every Student Succeeds Act. The new law still requires schools to demonstrate how well - or poorly - they're doing. But now states decide how to evaluate and improve schools, rather than the federal government.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Like any major disaster, when floods hit south Louisiana last month, big relief organizations streamed in - and people all over the world gave money. But it’s no longer just the big brand names of philanthropy that attract donations from afar. Crowdfunding has grown up, and now millions of dollars are funneled to small and specific causes. In Baton Rouge, it has changed the nature of flood relief efforts.

 

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Love them or hate them, short-term rentals are booming in New Orleans. On October, the City Council is expected to make its first vote on regulating short-term rentals. It’s considering rules proposed by the City Planning Commission.  One of the biggest points of contention is whole-house rentals. Many locals say that when short-term visitors rent whole homes, it changes neighborhoods.

Photo Credit: Alan Karchmer

This week on Inside the Arts, two celebrations of African American History. The long awaited Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture opened over the weekend  in Washington D. C.  We caught up with two New Orleanians who were among a select group invited for a sneak peek before the celebrated opening.

This week on The Reading Life:  Whitney Stewart talks about tracking her family's history through World War II for "Feldpost: The War Letters of Reiner Niemann." We’ll also hear from Raymond Boudreau, who’s the guest coordinator of Contraflow VI, the fantasy and science fiction convention coming up this weekend with featured guest Ben Bova. And Susan reviews Colson Whitehead's "The Underground Railroad."

Harry Shearer

This week, LeShow is LIVE from Kings Place for the London Podcast Festival with special musical guests Judith Owen and Lee Sklar.

This Continuum program presents three recorder concertos composed by three important contemporary English composers. They are: Richard Harvey, Sir Malcolm Arnold and Gordon Jacob.

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